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    Grade-Level General Education Curriculum Expectations for English Language Arts

     

    K

    Kindergarten students work with prompting and support to interact with literature or informational text by asking and answering questions and identifying details and main events. Students know and can name all letters, and they can print many letters. They can read common words and draw, tell or write about a book.

    1

    First grade students independently interact with literature or informational text by asking and answering questions and identifying details and main events. They can read aloud accurately and with expression. First grade students can print all letters and can write about events, topics, and opinions.

    2

    Second grade students accurately read and understand literature and informational text. They use correct grammar, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. They can plan and deliver a presentation about a story or experience.

    3

    Third grade students interact with literature and informational text by comparing and contrasting stories, discussing a point of view and comparing it with the author’s, and describing a series of events, ideas, or concepts. Along with their reading, third grade writing is more sophisticated. Students produce developed, focused, organized, and edited work. In writing informational pieces, they include charts or graphs and supply facts.

    4

    Fourth grade students read longer words and use roots, prefixes, and suffixes to determine the meanings of unknown words. They use details and examples in the text to determine the main idea and describe a character, setting, or event. Students produce writing that is developed, focused, organized, and edited. They group related ideas in paragraphs and sections, and provide a conclusion. Fourth grade students know when to use formal English, and when informal English is appropriate.

    5

    Fifth grade students build on their ability to read longer words, using roots, prefixes, and suffixes to determine the meaning of unknown words. Students explain how an author supports points in a text. They use quotes accurately when referring to the text. Students keep the audience in mind and include a clear sequence of events when writing. Students listen to a speaker or media source and identify reasons and evidence provided to support particular points. They identify and discuss misleading ideas.

    6

    Sixth grade students provide a summary of reading without personal opinions or judgments. They write a variety of pieces, including research projects, and use technology to publish the work. When presenting, students place descriptions, facts, and details in a logical order.

    7

    Seventh grade students read and understand grade-level nonfiction literature. They compare and contrast fictional and historical accounts. Students write a variety of pieces, creating organized arguments to support claims. When writing research projects, students collect additional questions for further research. They use eye contact, appropriate volume, and clear pronunciation when presenting.

    8

    Eighth grade students interact a great deal with literature and informational text. They use evidence from selections to analyze characters’ points of view and how the author uses dialogue.  Students cite textual evidence to support their analysis of text and identify how the structure contributes to the meaning and style of each text. In writing, students show relationships among experiences and events.

    9

    Ninth grade students continue to develop in literacy-rich environments as independent motivated readers and writers who think critically and take responsibility for their learning. They integrate and apply reading, writing, speaking, listening and the conventions of language across curriculums. They actively participate in inquiry based, student driven, engaging endeavors and collaborative learning situations to facilitate motivation and the foundation for lifelong learning. Frequent collaboration with peers and adults and analysis of a broad array of quality literary and informational texts of appropriate complexity, with increasing emphasis on informational text, create independent and proficient readers and communicators with an understanding of widely divergent cultures and experiences. Students use the writing process and the conventions of language to integrate information into text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas and avoid plagiarism by using standard citation. With increasing emphasis on informative/explanatory and argumentative writing and speaking, students conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to solve a problem and explore multiple avenues to support a research topic, analysis and/or reflection. They assess the authority and synthesize multiple print and digital sources. They critique oral and visual information and apply the information to global situations.

    10

    Tenth grade students make connections and transfer knowledge to new situations through research and writing in literacy-rich environments. They analyze, defend and support views using reading, writing, speaking, listening and the conventions of language across curriculums. They collaboratively participate in inquiry based, student driven, engaging endeavors that facilitate motivation and the foundation for lifelong learning. Thorough analysis of a broad array of quality literary and informational texts of appropriate complexity, with increasing emphasis on informational text, creates independent and proficient readers and communicators who appropriately initiate and discuss issues with widely divergent cultures. Students use technology to strengthen writing and use the writing process and the conventions of language to compose logical arguments and explanations with proper tone and form one or more points of view and present information and findings with clear and distinct perspective and style. They conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to solve a problem and explore multiple avenues to support a research topic, analysis and/or reflection.

    11

    Eleventh grade students focus on reading, writing, speaking, listening and the conventions of language across curriculums in educational endeavors and collaborative learning situations including analyzing and defending the representation of text in different artistic mediums and how authors draw on and transform source material. They initiate and participate in collaborative discussions, stimulate thoughtful exchange of ideas and evaluate speaker’s reasoning, tone and emphasis. They qualify or justify their own views and make new connections based on evidence and sound reasoning. Students use technology to strengthen and try new approaches to writing with increased emphasis on informational/explanatory and argumentative writing. They use the writing process and the conventions of language to compose logical arguments that establish significance using techniques such as metaphor, simile and analogy.

    12

    Twelfth grade students make connections, transfer knowledge to new situations through research and writing, and understand the value of literacy-rich environments. They set clear goals, deadlines and individual roles to promote civil, democratic discussions that probe reasoning, evidence and divergent and creative thinking. They use research to make informed decisions and solve problems independently. They analyze and articulate the value of and take responsibility for their learning. They focus on reading, writing, speaking, listening and the conventions of language across curriculums in educational endeavors and collaborative learning situations including complex, critical analysis and evaluation of how texts and ideas interact as well as how and why author’s craft impacts the quality and aesthetic value of texts. With increased emphasis on informational/explanatory and argumentative writing, they use the writing process and the conventions of language to compose logical arguments and explanations using rhetorical devices, varied syntax and relevant evidence anticipating the audience’s values and biases.