BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

Definition Eligibility Characteristics Strategies for School Strategies for Home

 

Definition

A behavior disorder is a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree that adversely affects the student's educational performance.

  1. an inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors:
  2. an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers;
  3. inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances;
  4. a general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression;
  5. a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems; or
  6. a schizophrenic condition
Eligibility

A behavior disorder is a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree that adversely affects the student's educational performance:

  • an inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors;
  • an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers;
  • inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances;
  • a general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression;
  • a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems; or
  • a schizophrenic condition.

The term does not apply to students who are socially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they meet the above definition.

Documentation the student meets all of the following criteria:

  1. continues to exhibit a behavior disorder consistent with the definition after interventions have been implemented;
  2. exhibits the characteristic(s) over an extended period of time and to a marked degree; and
  3. exhibits behavior(s) that is not primarily the result of physical, sensory, or intellectual deficits
Characteristics

            May include:

  • Attention-getting behavior
  • Low self-esteem
  • Limited problem solving skills
  • Poor impulse control
  • Defiance of authority figures
  • Low attention span
  • Minimal social interaction skills
  • May be very disruptive to others
  • Personal struggle with controlling self
  • Fears resulting form school problems
  • Problems in getting along with other
  • Conduct disorders
  • Behavior adversely affects learning
  • Hyperactive
  • Can be withdrawn
  • Insecure
  • Easily confused
  • Poor communication skills
  • Problems working in groups
  • General mood of unhappiness
  • Poor conflict resolution
  • Can be immature
  • Covers up emotions
  • Can be aggressive
  • May have personality disorder

Strategies for School

            Behavioral Strategies

  • Use positive reinforcers
  • Use behavior contracts
  • Do modeling
  • Do not place hands on students
  • Keep a sense of humor and use it
  • Solve problems privately not publicly
  • When disciplining the student address the specific behavior and avoid any indication that you dislike the student(s) personally
  • Label exact behavior desired; do not be subtle
  • Give two choices only: either/or
  • Be fmn, fair, and flexible
  • Avoid setting the student up for failure
  • Do not put unrealistic expectations on the students
  • Define classroom expectations relating to behavior and establish rules with the students
  • Have rules posted around the room
  • Make expectations clear
  • Avoid power struggles
  • Individualize behavior plans
  • Consistently interrelate with students
  • Establish contracts with students
  • Be consistent
  • Encourage students to make choices
  • Provide time-out options
  • Involve parents
  • Establish a detailed behavior plan, with consequences, and share this with the students
  • Teach problem solving strategies
  • Guide students in a discussion of the problem (assisting them to define the problem precisely, establishing appropriate goals, and assisting them suggesting solutions)
  • Work with students on the relationship between their behavior in the classroom and in the community
Strategies for Home
  • State expectations for your child
  • Support the behavior management program in seat school by following through with plan at home
  • Work cooperatively with school staff
  • Communicate an attitude of care and concern to your child
  • Seek psychological, counseling, or medical services to assist with you child's treatment