Intellectual Disability


Intellectual Disability


Definition:

Intellectual disability is defined as significantly subaverage intellectual functioning that exits concurrently with deficits in adaptive skill areas. These deficits are manifested during the developmental period and adversely affect the student’s educational performance.


Eligibility:

General Intellectual functioning

  1. The mild to moderate intellectual disability has general intellectual functioning that ranges from two to three standard deviations below the mean, in consideration of 1.0 standard error of measurement as determined by a qualified psychologist using an intelligence test

  2. The moderate to severe intellectual disability has general intellectual functioning more than three standard deviations below the mean, in consideration of 1.0 standard error of measurement as determined by a qualified psychologist using an intelligence test

  1. The student displays concurrent deficits in adaptive functioning expected for their age in at least two of the following areas: home living, self-care, communication, social/interpersonal skills, use of community resources, self-direction, functional academic skills, work, leisure, health or safety

  2. Age is eighteen or below

  3. The condition adversely affects their educational performance

  4. The student needs special education


Special Considerations:

Consideration is given when assessing students with cultural and language differences in order to prevent inappropriate identification of these students. Evaluation teams consider using nonverbal tests of intellectual ability when the student is culturally or linguistically diverse. All tests are given individually and they are designed and normed for the population being tested.


Characteristics:

  • Difficulty understanding/answering questions

  • Easily led or persuaded by others

  • Inability to read/write

  • Academic difficulties in school across all subjects

  • Difficulty with working memory

  • Weak vocabulary skills


Strategies for School:

  • Use simple sentences

  • Repeat instructions frequently

  • Keep distractions and transitions to a minimum

  • Encourage students provide positive feedback

  • Use alternative instructional strategies and alternative assessment methods

  • Use mnemonics , chunking, and role modeling to present information

  • Review frequently

  • Use visuals


Strategies for Home:

  • Inform the school about your child’s needs

  • Role model desired behaviors

  • Give immediate feedback